Closed Projects

BokSmart “Safe Six” Injury Prevention Programme

BokSmart “Safe Six” Injury Prevention Programme

Rugby union (hence ‘rugby’) is an international sport played in over 100 countries worldwide, at amateur and professional levels. Within South Africa, rugby is extremely popular with approximately 600,000 participants. The injury incidence and severity of rugby is reported to be one of the highest of all sports. This is largely explained by the high frequency of collisions between players, inherent to the sport. This high burden of injuries in rugby has required preventative measures to be implemented.

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Evaluation of the implementation effectiveness of the 'Strengthen your Ankle' app to prevent recurrent ankle sprains

Evaluation of the implementation effectiveness of the 'Strengthen your Ankle' app to prevent recurrent ankle sprains

 

Ankle sprains continue to pose a significant burden to the individual athlete, as well as society as a whole. However, despite ankle sprains being the single most common athletic injury and despite an active approach by various Dutch organizations in implementing our epidemiological knowledge on cost-effectiveness, large-scale community uptake of preventive measures, and thus actual prevention of ankle sprains, is lagging well behind. In an attempt to bridge this implementation gap VeiligheidNL looked into the possible role of new (social) media and has developed an freely available interactive App (‘Versterk je enkel’; available for iOS and Android) that contains - next to general advice on bracing and taping - the cost-effective neuromuscular program. This provides the user with, amongst others, video’s and an interactive exercise schedule. It is general belief that such interactive, online and mobile methods of information transfer are the way forward in implementation efforts. However, this has not yet been formally established for the uptake of evidence injury preventive measures, and - although user reviews are positive - the ‘Versterk je enkel’ App has not been evaluated against the ‘regular’ approach to advocate the neuromuscular program on paper and DVD.

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HealthPACT: a framework for prevention of sports injuries on the field

HealthPACT: a framework for prevention of sports injuries on the field

Regular participation in physical activity and sports increases the individual’s exposure to injury. Over the past decades the knowledge about prevention and treatment of various sports and physical activity related injuries (SPRI’s) has exponentially grown. Fortunately, based on the current available evidence it is reasonable to state that we are able to significantly cut down the risk of SPRI’s in for most participants in a wide array of sports and physical activities. However, wide-scale implementation of (cost-)effective measures under real-life conditions proves to be an ongoing challenge. 

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Running for health: the net health effect of running

Running for health: the net health effect of running

The objectives of this project are: (1) to summarise the evidence about the health benefits of running on biomedical health-indicators; (2) to summarise the evidence about the prevalence and incidence of the main running injuries; (3) to investigate the prevalence, nature and economical burden of running injuries in two different populations (trail and novice runners); and (4) to use the Knowledge Transfer Scheme (KTS) as a way to develop a strategy to implement in practice the current knowledge on running injury prevention.

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Sports Injury Prevention in Practice

Sports Injury Prevention in Practice

In the Netherlands, interventions have been developed and implemented to increase the uptake and correct use of efficacious preventive measures by community-level (amateur) athletes, with the overall goal to prevent sports injuries. These interventions include both primary and secondary sports injury prevention with the focus on individual athletes, trainers/coaches, sport clubs, and referees, within various field-based sport settings. Process and effect evaluations of these interventions provide insight into what works in real-world sport settings. The overall aim of the project is to gain insight into the effectiveness of various intervention strategies to promote the large-scale implementation of effective preventive interventions in real-world sports settings and optimize future implementation efforts.

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The effect of schoolzones on children's physical activity

FUNDING

The project is funded by the Sport programme of the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMw).

PROJECT PARTNERS

  • TNO
  • the Amsterdam Public Health Service
  • Jantje Beton Foundation
  • the Netherlands Institute for Sport and Physical Activity (NISB)
  • Royal HaskoningDHV
  • the City Region of Amsterdam
  • The Hague University of Applied Sciences

BACKGROUND

When children are involved in physical activity from an early age, this has a positive effect on their health later in life. This, in turn, will reduce future healthcare costs. That is why there is a great need for effective measures that stimulate children to be physically active. The built environment, and especially the school environment, can play a major role in promoting youth’s physical activity levels. The school environment provides the opportunity to reach children with diverse backgrounds within a setting in which children spend a large proportion of their time. Research has shown that a safer environment with sufficient crossing points and play areas has a positive effect on the amount of sports and exercise that children engage in.

SCHOOLZONES

In recent years, local Dutch governments have started to promote the traffic safety in the vicinity of primary school buildings, designating these area as a so-called ‘schoolzone’. Schoolzones increase traffic safety in the primary school area through infrastructural changes. These changes may include measures such as sidewalk improvements, traffic calming, pedestrian or bicycle crossings, bicycle facilities and traffic signs. Besides these infrastructural changes, education of the parents and enforcement of new regulations are an important part of the schoolzone. If, in addition to increasing traffic safety, these school zones have a positive influence on the amount sports and physical activity in youth, this can be an added incentive for local authorities to invest in them. TNO and the VU University Medical Center (VUmc) are conducting research to establish whether school zones are also encouraging children to be physically active.

STUDY METHODS

The School Zones project runs for three years (2013-2016) andcompares  schools that acquire schoolzones with those that do not. In total, 10 primary schools in the Netherlands will take part in the study. Physical activity and location of 400 children in stage 6 and 7 (9-11 years old) will be monitored using accelerometers and GPS. In addition to this objective measurement of physical activity, changes in the school environment will be assessed using questionnaires and observations. The cost-effectiveness of various measures will also be studied. This will provide insight into the factors that determine the success or failure of school zones to stimulate physical activity.


Recent posts

The Health & Safety of the Elite Swimmer

The Health & Safety of the Elite Swimmer

While aquatic sports have relatively low incidence of acute injuries there are health risks for the elite aquatic athlete. This project focuses on the health and safety of the elite swimmer in addition to the role of the International Federation in safeguarding the health and well-being of its athletes. In this study, various aspects of elite aquatic athlete health will be investigated to identify the prevalence of acute injuries and illnesses.

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